Photography

Fitting-In

Life-Is-All-Smoke-And-Mirrors

Christmas-Lights

Lost-And-Never-Found

“Mien Me” is an ongoing project by Alexander Benz He started it in late 2015 and is based on his earlier work where he has used high speed film to document people around him in a nonintrusive way.

 

Most subjects in his work are strangers and he often only gets a brief moment of interaction. He is interested in the relationship between people and their every-day environment, how they fit into this world, metaphorically and literally speaking.

 

The work happens naturally, but most of the pictures are reenactments of something seen at that very moment. An instant that is slightly staged there and then only, blurring the line between documentary and purely set up photography. He likes to portray the people he photographs as intimate as possible and show what the person radiates naturally, reflecting an identity based on his observation.

Link: abenz.com

 

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“Through digital communication like Facebook, Twitter, online dating and personal websites, the representation of our personality becomes more and more streamlined. We have the possibility to project an idea of how we are as a person into the world around us, but with the constant option of censoring information and invent fictional characteristics. Never have we had access to so much information about each other, and never has the information been so unreliable.”
To read more about this project and see more work by Johan Rosenmunte, go here.

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http://www.josephford.net

http://www.josephford.net

http://www.josephford.net

This project, by Brighton based photographer Joseph Ford, combines aerial landscapes with matching fashion. To perfectly combine the two different shots must have taken quite some time in planning and executing. I just love those diptychs and the fresh approach to combine fashion with landscapes like this. to see more of Ford’s work, go here.

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Dropping, by Alberto Seveso, are fluid sculptures made of mixed ink and oil, captured using high-speed photography.
The title is very important to Alberto, because it is a tribute to the master of the dripping technique, Jackson Pollock. To see more of his work, go here.

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Exploded Flowers is a new photo series by artist Fong Qi Wei, showing the radial symmetry of flowers and individual floral components. This series is inspired partially by Todd McLellan’s Disassembly series. The series placed second in the International Photography Awards

To see more of this beautiful body of work, go here.

 

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Just came across those fascinating photographs by  Jay Mark Johnson, depicting our surrounding a bit different than we are used to. Basically, everything that is moving becomes visible and everything that is standing still shows up “blurry”. Here is a brief explanation of the slit camera technique he is using to record those images:
Johnson produces photographic images that challenge the norms of perception. Employing a process that is distinct from conventional photography, he creates works that merge the recording of space and time into a single, linear “spacetime” continuum. The resulting photographs are akin to both seismographs and electrocardiograms in that, as timelines, they begin on the left and end on the right. The horizontal length of the image conveys an uninterrupted and fluid measurement of a brief span of time, varying in duration from 10 seconds up to 45 minutes. Text by ACE Gallery

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This wonderful umbrella installation is a part of an art festival called Agitagueda in Agueda, Portugal. They are located in a small town just south of Porto. The photographs were taken by Patrícia Almeida. To see more of this series visit her Flickr page here.

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Found In Nature is an interesting photo project by New York based photographer Barry Rosenthal. While working on another project, called Photobotanicus, Rosenthal came across discarded objects found on beaches, collected and rearranged them before documenting the materials found. To see more of this particular project, go here.

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I just love this series of pictures of flying houses by France based photographer Laurent Chehere. Naturally it seems that the pictures have been inspired by the movie UP, but without the houses being cute nor using balloons to make them float. To see more images by Laurent Chehere go here.

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If you’ve ever wondered how much of any food you can fit into a plastic bottle, look no further. Mæt, by  Danish artist Per Johansen, consists of reproductions of meat, vegetables, pasta and other foods which are claustrophobically placed in various synthetic plastic containers. At first glance the images might look somehow appealing, but as more time you spend looking at them as more they turn into something decadent, disgusting and incarcerated. To see more of those lovely images, go here.

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Thomas Demand is a German artist turning memories into paper sculptures. After doing some research online I found quite a few photographs of his installations that are equally intriguing. They can be found here, here and here. There is also an additional interview by Monocle.

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33 RPM, by Stockholm based photographer Philip Karlberg, is a photo series showing food installations in motion. Each dish is mounted onto a record which is put into motion by a underlying turntable. I truly enjoy looking at those dishes this way. It reminds me of the way one looks at food served in a restaurant by checking it out from side to side before eating it. To see more of this particular series, go here. and if you want to listen to the playlist of the records used in the pictures, go here.

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Ruined Polaroids is a polaroid series by New York based photographer William Miller. I love how a seemingly broken camera can create such interesting looking, abstract work of art. Having experimented with pollards myself I always do appreciate when coming across such projects as this one. To see more pictures of this series, go here.

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Just came across those lovely photos, by Kevin Twomey, of low tech devices. I remember having once found one of those in my grandfathers basement and having spent a whole day disassembling it. It was fascinating to see how that many mechanical parts could be packet into such a machine. To see more images of this series, go here.

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I just adore those photos by Swiss/Italian photographer and graphic designer Christian TagliaviniDame di Cartone is a portrait series of women dressed entirely in cardboard. The different styles include 17th century, fifties and cubism. To see more of the 2012 Hasselblad Award winner’s work, go here.

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If you live anywhere in Europe right now, you’re most likely experiencing subzero temperatures. Antarctica In A Bag is a beautiful photo series by Belgian architect Francois Delfosse, creating the illusion of large icy landscapes using nothing more than a ordinary plastic bags. To see more of his work go here.

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Just came across those intriguing pictures by US artist Nancy Fouts. I just love how she combines two unrelated objects and transforms them into a beautiful, surreal setting. Somehow the images look so innocent at first, but once you study them close up you can apply all kinds of interpretations to them.  To see more of her work go here.

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The Sweden based artist Sanna Dullaway has recently started her own business in restoring and colorizing old black & white photographs. I love how the colorized versions of those old classic photographs seem to give each image a whole new meaning. After all, the age and quality of a certain pictures is a part of its history. To see more, go here.

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I really enjoy looking at those intriguing photo-collages by Paris based designer Nacho Ormaechea. It’s as if his camera was able to catch deep, inner emotions, dreams or fears of those strangers while going about their everyday lives. To see more images from this series, go here.

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Tree, Line, by Zander Olsen, is an ongoing series of constructed photographs rooted in the forest. These works, carried out in Surrey, Hampshire and Wales, involve site specific interventions in the landscape, ‘wrapping’ trees with white material to construct a visual relationship between tree, not-tree and the line of horizon according to the camera’s viewpoint. – Love it! To see more images, go here.

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Giorgio von Arb, Leute am Grabserberg, 1988 / Walter Mittelholzer, Alpenflug, 1928


Jakob Tuggener, Fabrik, 1943


Andri Pol, Grüezi, 2006 / Andreas Seibert, From Somewhere to Nowhere, 2008

The Swiss Foundation for Photography (Fotostiftung Schweiz) is marking its fortieth anniversary by presenting a fresh view of Swiss photography – a tour d’horizon covering a range of illuminating photobooks in which not only the great themes of photography are reflected, but also the development of photographic styles and modes of expression.

Since the late 1920s the book has repeatedly proved itself to be an ideal platform for the presentation of photographic works. Books have not only contributed to the dissemination and transmission of photography, but also facilitated the integration of the individual image into a meaningful context. To get more info about the exhibition including location and opening hours, go here.

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A beautiful collection of photographs taken by Google street view cameras from around the world. The images where found and edited by the american photographer Aaron Hobson. To see more images, go here. To see more of Aaron Hobson work, go here.

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As each of us has his own impression of Afghanistan that is predominantly marked with pictures of foreign forces, explosions and terror, we were privileged to have access to capture daily life and portrait some people of Afghanistan. Lukas Augustin & Salome Augustin, the producers of this lovely short documentary, hope that the pictures you know will merge with the pictures you see and will enrich your view on the country in the Hindu Kush.

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“Self Portrait 1889″ remake by Seth Johnson


“Wanderer above the Sea of Fog, 1818″ remake by Spencer Harding


“The Death of Marat” remake by Ewa Wiktoria Dyszlewicz

Booooooom and Adobe have teamed up to encourage people to remake a famous work of art using photography. The outcome of this project is remarkable. If you’d like to join in, go here. If you’d like to see more remakes, go here.

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Tokihiro Sato is one of Japan’s best known artists working in photography. Trained as a sculptor, he has been using photography since the late 1980s to express his ideas about light and space. In an ongoing series that he describes as “breath graphs” or “photo respiration,” tiny points of light or illuminated lines record his movements through space. Lovely! To see more, go here.

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